Archive for July, 2008

Sample Set is Complete

July 28, 2008

I finished the last fringe on those 8 samples I’ve been making for the Manitoba Museum. This project has been sponsored by Manitoba Culture Heritage and Tourism, by Manitoba Artists in Healthcare, and by the St Boniface General Hospital.

They were woven using a fine 2/8 worsted wool (with one exception). I’ve been working on this since September of 2007

The 8 samples, again, close up, include

The Nested Chevron, or W Pattern:

W, or Nested Chevron Pattern

W, or Nested Chevron Pattern

The Double Arrowhead Pattern:

Two arrowhead patterns, outlined in beads

Two arrowhead patterns, outlined in beads

The Flame Pattern:

Flame Pattern

Flame Pattern

The ‘oblique’ or ‘bias weave’ or ‘Woodlands’ Pattern:

Beaded 'oblique' Pattern

White glass beads, worked on a background of red threads in the 'oblique' or 'biasweave' method are associated with groups of the Eastern Woodlands

Classic Assomption:

The arrowhead and lightning pattern, in this color sequence, seen in collections all over North America is classic of those created for the fur trade in Assomption, Québec

The arrowhead and lightning pattern, in this color sequence, seen in collections all over North America is classic of those created for the fur trade in Assomption, Québec

(I worked this ‘classic Assomption’ in Silk, as silk was sometimes used in these sashes.

Variation of the Assomption Pattern

The sash belonging to Métis leader Elzéar Goulet of arrow-and-lightning pattern was very loosely woven.

The sash belonging to Métis leader Elzéar Goulet of arrow-and-lightning pattern was very loosely woven.

And another Variant

Sash worn by Lord Strathcona features the arrow-and-lightning motif, two lightning pieces joined in a seam up the middle

Sash worn by Lord Strathcona features the arrow-and-lightning motif, two lightning pieces joined by a seam up the middle

And lastly the Chénier Pattern

Sash pattern famous for its association with a medical doctor, killed in 1837, wore a sash of this pattern

Sash pattern famous for its association with a medical doctor, Jean-Olivier Chénier, killed in 1837, wore a sash of this pattern

Old Fort William

July 18, 2008

July 8 I travelled to Atikokan, Ontario, and Quetico Provincial Park. A lovely place, breathtaking scenery, I was treated to an amazing tour by Val Fraser.

Val showed me a sash that had been found in the area, a lovely example of 19th century work.

Val Fraser, Carol, and sash

Val Fraser, Carol, and sash

Old Fort William in Thunder Bay was the site of a RendezVous July 9-13 and I was there. The David Thompson Brigade made a spectacular arrival on July 12. Canoe after canoe paddling up to the shore.

David Thompson Brigade Arrival

David Thompson Brigade Arrival

I was honored to meet Professor Kirk Wipper, Founder of the Canadian Canoe Museum.

I also had the pleasure of chatting with Barry Wolframe, retired carpenter at Old Fort William, and fingerweaver extraordinaire.

Carol and Barry, sashweavers both

Carol and Barry, sashweavers both

I’ve just competed a pair of suspenders for a client who intends to wear them at a Big Event in his life soon.

Special order fingerweaving

Special order fingerweaving

I have also been corresponding with Steve Pretty of the Braid Society in the UK. We are working on an article to appear in the Braid Society publication ‘Strands’, featuring the technique for the ‘bias weave’ or ‘oblique method’, as well as a biographical piece on Carol James

Sample made using 'biasweave' method

Sample made using 'biasweave' method

Vikings and Voyageurs

July 9, 2008

Canada Day I spent time at the Mint, Citizenship ceremonies, as well as featuring the new coin commemorating the arrival of Samuel de Champlain.

Samuel de Champlain visits with Olivia and Carol

Samuel de Champlain visits with Olivia and Carol

July 5&6 Olivia hosted Viking Days in Gimli, Manitoba. I prepared two tablet-woven strips, between which I worked some sprang to form a cap. For perspective, that’s a chop stick in the shed of my sprang.

tablet woven bands hold the threads to be spranged

tablet woven bands hold the threads to be spranged

Today, July 9, I finished weaving #8 of the 8 fingerwoven pieces for the Manitoba Heritage project. Now to finish up the fringes, and I’m DONE!

Carol finishes the 8th swatch

Carol finishes the 8th swatch

Now on to other projects, weaving more sashes, catching up on orders.

I’ve been working on recording the book Fingerweaving Untangled, putting it onto a DVD, along with pertinent video clips. Actually I began voice recording while at Convergence. Unfortunately the mechanism we were using yielded a less-than-desirable product, lots of machine noise in the audio track. So, later this month I intend to actively seek professional help … for the recording of the DVD.

Tomorrow I’m off to Thunder Bay, for the Old Fort William RendezVous. Hoping to meet up with the David Thompson Brigade folks again. En route I’ll be stopping by Atikokan, and Quetico Provincial Park.

Hope youall are having a pleasant Summer.

Convergence 2008

July 4, 2008

Flew to Tampa, Florida, for the Handweaver’s Guild of America Convergence 2008. Workshops of all stripes, to totally expand my weaving horizons. Amazing people. Mind blowing exhibits.

Carol learns the coiling method for basket weaving

Carol learns the coiling method for basket weaving

It seems that the book Fingerweaving Untangled is a hot item. All the vendors had copies, and were wanting more. The 120 copies I had shipped to my hotel room were spoken for immediately.

On the way back I stopped in Minneapolis for the book launch at Ft Snelling. A very pleasant Summer day, lots of visitors to the Fort, a great deal of interest in making a ‘friendship bracelet’.

Back in Winnipeg, I’ll be finishing the 8th sample for the Manitoba Museum set.