Sample Set is Complete

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I finished the last fringe on those 8 samples I’ve been making for the Manitoba Museum. This project has been sponsored by Manitoba Culture Heritage and Tourism, by Manitoba Artists in Healthcare, and by the St Boniface General Hospital.

They were woven using a fine 2/8 worsted wool (with one exception). I’ve been working on this since September of 2007

The 8 samples, again, close up, include

The Nested Chevron, or W Pattern:

W, or Nested Chevron Pattern

W, or Nested Chevron Pattern

The Double Arrowhead Pattern:

Two arrowhead patterns, outlined in beads

Two arrowhead patterns, outlined in beads

The Flame Pattern:

Flame Pattern

Flame Pattern

The ‘oblique’ or ‘bias weave’ or ‘Woodlands’ Pattern:

Beaded 'oblique' Pattern

White glass beads, worked on a background of red threads in the 'oblique' or 'biasweave' method are associated with groups of the Eastern Woodlands

Classic Assomption:

The arrowhead and lightning pattern, in this color sequence, seen in collections all over North America is classic of those created for the fur trade in Assomption, Québec

The arrowhead and lightning pattern, in this color sequence, seen in collections all over North America is classic of those created for the fur trade in Assomption, Québec

(I worked this ‘classic Assomption’ in Silk, as silk was sometimes used in these sashes.

Variation of the Assomption Pattern

The sash belonging to Métis leader Elzéar Goulet of arrow-and-lightning pattern was very loosely woven.

The sash belonging to Métis leader Elzéar Goulet of arrow-and-lightning pattern was very loosely woven.

And another Variant

Sash worn by Lord Strathcona features the arrow-and-lightning motif, two lightning pieces joined in a seam up the middle

Sash worn by Lord Strathcona features the arrow-and-lightning motif, two lightning pieces joined by a seam up the middle

And lastly the Chénier Pattern

Sash pattern famous for its association with a medical doctor, killed in 1837, wore a sash of this pattern

Sash pattern famous for its association with a medical doctor, Jean-Olivier Chénier, killed in 1837, wore a sash of this pattern

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2 Responses to “Sample Set is Complete”

  1. N'tanice Says:

    I live in Edmonton, w do you have any idea here can I learn how to weave these sashes?
    I’m very interested in learning this art!

  2. etsy Says:

    I never see the post like this before, which actually gives me a lot of things. Thanks for your kindness.

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